Electronic shop – Computer Chip 7 http://computerchip7.com/ Fri, 13 May 2022 22:01:11 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://computerchip7.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/09/icon-30.png Electronic shop – Computer Chip 7 http://computerchip7.com/ 32 32 5 tips for launching a startup quickly https://computerchip7.com/5-tips-for-launching-a-startup-quickly/ Fri, 13 May 2022 22:01:11 +0000 https://computerchip7.com/5-tips-for-launching-a-startup-quickly/ Launching a startup can be a daunting task for many. Many new businesses fail to start due to capital issues, poor market research, poor business plans, or poor location. Statistics show that about 20% of new businesses fail within the first two years, 45% within the first five years, and 65% within the first ten […]]]>

Launching a startup can be a daunting task for many. Many new businesses fail to start due to capital issues, poor market research, poor business plans, or poor location. Statistics show that about 20% of new businesses fail within the first two years, 45% within the first five years, and 65% within the first ten years. However, despite these challenges, you can find ways to successfully launch a profitable startup in a short time. Here are some strategies you can use.

1. Start immediately

Most entrepreneurs spend a lot of time wondering when to start. Instead of waiting to start at the right time, it is better to start operations immediately. Address the first things that need to be done and move the business forward. While some entrepreneurs already have a great business idea and know what to sell, others have many ideas. If you are in the second category, try the first idea you have. If that doesn’t work, redefine your strategy.

2. Ask for advice

When you start a business, you may not have all the answers. For example, you need to find a competent lawyer to guide you through legal proceedings. You can also find an experienced entrepreneur to be your mentor. They are more likely to know best practices in accounting, manufacturing, and business management. 92% of small business owners say mentors have had a major impact on their business growth. With mentorship, you can start the business much faster.

3. Find a business partner

Launching a startup quickly requires substantial capital. You also need money to run the business every day. In addition, there are a lot of responsibilities and skills required. A business partner can provide expertise and funding, helping the business grow. If your co-founder has a good credit history, it becomes easier to apply for financing from banks or credit unions. However, if these funding sources don’t work out, there are other ways to get start-up funds. Consider applying for car title loan online to secure cash. You can combine your efforts to get more money.

4. Invest in marketing

Marketing your startup gets the word out to more people. If you want to launch the startup quickly, spend time and money on marketing campaigns. Focus on digital content marketing by creating blog posts, website content, social media posts, and newsletters to reach potential customers. 82% of marketers use content marketing strategies to promote their products and services. Having the right strategy will get your business noticed quickly.

5. Talk to potential customers

If you want to sell your products or services, you need to know what consumers want. You need to talk to potential customers and get information about what they want, then develop a strategy. Customer satisfaction is paramount, so take the time to understand your target market. The sooner you do this, the faster your business will grow.

Starting a business takes a lot of commitment. But with the right strategy, you can accelerate your startup and get it up and running. Use these tips and lead your business to success.

The Daily Californian’s editorial staff and newsroom staff were not involved in the production of this advertisement. For advertising and sponsorship opportunities or more information on paid content, contact [email protected]

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Stripping Wealth on Purpose: The Impact of Predatory Lenders in Memphis – Non Profit News https://computerchip7.com/stripping-wealth-on-purpose-the-impact-of-predatory-lenders-in-memphis-non-profit-news/ Wed, 11 May 2022 13:14:08 +0000 https://computerchip7.com/stripping-wealth-on-purpose-the-impact-of-predatory-lenders-in-memphis-non-profit-news/ Photo by Avel Chuklanov on Unsplash Memphis, according to the 2020 census, is home to approximately 633,000 people, of which 64.5% are African American. As a new report from the Memphis Black Clergy Collaborative (BCCM) and Political Institute of Hope—the political arm of Hope Credit Union, a Delta-based Community Development Financial Institution (CDFI), demonstrates Memphis […]]]>
Photo by Avel Chuklanov on Unsplash

Memphis, according to the 2020 census, is home to approximately 633,000 people, of which 64.5% are African American. As a new report from the Memphis Black Clergy Collaborative (BCCM) and Political Institute of Hope—the political arm of Hope Credit Union, a Delta-based Community Development Financial Institution (CDFI), demonstrates Memphis is also home to an astounding 114 storefronts of predatory lenders. That’s more than one showcase for 6,000 people.

Those 114 storefronts, the report’s authors point out, represent “more than double the number of Starbucks and McDonalds combined” in the entire city (2). This is just one of the conclusions of the two organisations’ new report, entitled High-Cost Debt Traps Widen Racial Wealth Gap in Memphis, which examines at the micro level how the daily extraction of wealth from black Americans occurs in the city of Memphis, Tennessee.

Memphis, as census data also shows, is tied for being the second poorest major city in the nation (500,000 or more), with a 2020 poverty rate 24.6%. By depriving working-class and especially black neighborhoods of assets, predatory interest rates reinforce this poverty. In Memphis, 45% of black households and more than 50% of Latinx households are unbanked or underbanked, compared to 15% of white households (6). People without full banking services are of course most likely to turn to other sources of finance, including predatory lenders.

Memphis in Context: The National Reach of Predatory Lending

To NPQ we have written regularly about the racial wealth gap. Often the focus is on how to build BIPOC wealth. But no one should lose sight of the fact that BIPOC’s wealth is being stripped from communities every day. As Jeremie Greer of Liberation in a Generation wrote in Refuge Strength earlier this year: “The racial wealth gap is a systemic problem, not a product of the personal choices of black people. And no matter how many wealth-creating opportunities we create for black people and other people of color, those efforts will never be effective if we leave the processes of wealth stripping intact.

One of the processes described by Greer is predatory lending – loans with three-digit interest rates. According to a article published by the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, the “payday loan” represents a market of 9 billion dollars. As an economist Jeanette Bennett writes, on average “the typical $375 loan will incur $520 in fees due to repeated borrowing”. If check cashers and related businesses are added, the size of the predatory lending industry is even greater. An estimate puts the number at $19.1 billion. Black and Latino families are disproportionately affected. And as a recent study by Jim Hawkinsprofessor of law at the University of Houston, and Tiffany Pennerrecently graduated from law school, published in the Emory Law Review documents, marketing is biased to attract borrowers of color.

In their paper, Hawkins and Penner found that in Houston, “while African Americans make up only 15.6% of auto title lender customers and 23% of payday lender customers, 34.8% of photographs on the websites of these lenders represent African Americans”. They add that 77.3% of ads in physical locations they surveyed targeted borrowers of color.

How predatory lending extracts wealth from communities

Predatory lenders go by many names, with payday loans, car title loans, and flex loans being the most common. Whatever their name, they have in common three-digit interest rates and coercive repayment mechanisms. In their report, Hope Policy Institute and BCCM describe how these lending mechanisms work:

Payday Loans: In Memphis, under Tennessee state law, a borrower can charge an annual percentage rate (APR) of 460% on a two-week loan. Some states allow even higher interest rates; Texas has the highest in the country, with a 664 percent APR.

What does 460% translate to bi-weekly? In fact, this equates to a fee of just over $17.50 per $100 borrowed. As the report’s authors explain, “Payday lenders gain access to a borrower’s bank account by requiring a post-dated paper check or electronic banking authorization (ACH) as part of the loan transaction. This means that the day a borrower receives their income – whether it is their paycheck, stimulus check, or Social Security check – the payday lender is first in line for repayment” ( 8). These loans can – and of course are regularly – rolled over for a certain price; more than 75% of payday lenders’ fees are generated by people who borrow for 10 consecutive periods of two weeks or more.

Car title loans: These are not guaranteed by a paycheck, but by a vehicle. According to the report’s authors, a typical loan of $300 will incur fees of $66 for 30 days, an effective APR of 267%. Like payday loans, these loans are typically rolled over, according to national data, an average of eight times. In Tennessee, in 2019, the most recent year for which data is available, 45% of car title loans issued that year defaulted and more than 11,000 cars were repossessed (9). Notably, 2019 was, relatively speaking, a good year for car title borrowers in Tennessee. In the six-year period from 2014 to 2019, title lending companies repossessed more than 101,000 cars statewide, an average of nearly 17,000 repossessions per year.

Flexible loans: These were created in Tennessee in 2014 and act like an open-ended line of credit that can be secured by a paycheck or a car. While payday loans are capped at $500, flexible loans allow you to borrow up to $4,000.  Tennessee state law sets the interest rate for flexible loans at 24%; however, borrowers must also pay daily port charges, or “usual charges,” of up to 255%, resulting in an effective combined annual rate of 279% (9).

The geography of lending

As noted above, the marketing efforts of predatory lenders are aimed at attracting borrowers of color. What’s more, when you look at a map of Memphis’ 114 predatory lending storefronts, it’s clear that the location of these storefronts is anything but random, almost all located in neighborhoods heavily populated by people of color.

In addition to tracing the geography of storefront physical location, the report’s authors also trace the geography of storefront ownership. As the report details, 74 of the 114 storefronts are owned by companies headquartered outside of Tennessee, 52 of which are owned by just two companies: Ace Cash Express (Populus Finance Group) of Texas and Title Max (TMX). Financing) of Georgia. This means that more than half of the profits generated by payday lenders, title companies and flex lenders are extracted entirely from the Memphis community and instead end up in the hands of out-of-state investors and managers.

Political solutions

There are many complex issues regarding economic policy. However, the end of three-digit interest rates is not one of them. As BCCM President Reverend J. Lawrence Turner puts it in the report, which he co-authored, the impact of charging interest of up to 460% on loans serves to “effectively entrap workers poor in webs of long-term debt” (7).

It should be noted that today’s predatory lending is a relatively recent development. Like Pew Charitable Trusts has documentedalthough he may appear payday lenders have always been with us, this is not the case. Beginning in 1916, and for many decades, states limited monthly interest rates to 3.5%; annual APR ratings ranged from state to state from 18 to 42 percent. This changed with consumer protection deregulation in the 1970s and 1980s. As Pew puts it, “As this deregulation continued, some state legislatures sought to act in kind for lenders based in the state by allowing deferred presentment transactions (loans made against a post-dated check) and three-digit APRs. These developments set the stage for state-licensed payday loan shops to flourish.

Even today, only 18 states and the District of Columbia cap loans at annual rates of 36% or less. They include many Northeastern states (Vermont, New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and Maryland). But many others have also taken action. For example, in the South, Arkansas, West Virginia, North Carolina and Georgia have passed similar laws. In the West and Midwest, similar laws exist in Illinois, Montana, South Dakota, Nebraska, Colorado, and Arizona. A recent American banker The article adds that similar legislation is currently being debated in four other states: Michigan, Minnesota, New Mexico and Rhode Island. There is also pending federal legislation introduced by Sen. Sherrod Brown (D-OH) that would create a maximum rate of 36% nationwide.

The report’s authors add that even if the Senate blocks legislative action, the federal Consumer Financial Protection Bureau could use its regulatory authority to act. “The CFPB,” the authors insist, “has the ability to enact new rules that ensure high-cost lenders, like those in Memphis, don’t endlessly trap people in cycles of unaffordable debt like they currently doing” (7).

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ELEVATE CREDIT, INC. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations (Form 10-Q) https://computerchip7.com/elevate-credit-inc-managements-discussion-and-analysis-of-financial-condition-and-results-of-operations-form-10-q/ Fri, 06 May 2022 16:34:06 +0000 https://computerchip7.com/elevate-credit-inc-managements-discussion-and-analysis-of-financial-condition-and-results-of-operations-form-10-q/ The following Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations ("MD&A") is intended to help the reader understand our business, our results of operations and our financial condition. The MD&A is provided as a supplement to, and should be read in conjunction with our unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements and the related […]]]>
The following Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and
Results of Operations ("MD&A") is intended to help the reader understand our
business, our results of operations and our financial condition. The MD&A is
provided as a supplement to, and should be read in conjunction with our
unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements and the related notes and
other financial information included elsewhere in this Quarterly Report on Form
10-Q.

Some of the information contained in this discussion and analysis, including
information with respect to our plans and strategy for our business, includes
forward-looking statements that involve risks and uncertainties. You should
review the "Note About Forward-Looking Statements" section of this Quarterly
Report on Form 10-Q for a discussion of important factors that could cause
actual results to differ materially from the results described in or implied by
the forward-looking statements contained in the following discussion and
analysis. We generally refer to loans, customers and other information and data
associated with each of our brands (Rise, Elastic and Today Card) as Elevate's
loans, customers, information and data, irrespective of whether Elevate directly
originates the credit to the customer or whether such credit is originated by a
third party.

OVERVIEW

We provide online credit solutions to consumers in the US who are not
well-served by traditional bank products and who are looking for better options
than payday loans, title loans, pawn and storefront installment loans. Non-prime
consumers now represent a larger market than prime consumers but are riskier to
underwrite and serve with traditional approaches. We're succeeding at it - and
doing it responsibly - with best-in-class advanced technology and proprietary
risk analytics honed by serving more than 2.7 million customers with $10.0
billion in credit. Our current online credit products, Rise, Elastic and Today
Card, reflect our mission to provide customers with access to competitively
priced credit and services while helping them build a brighter financial future
with credit building and financial wellness features. We call this mission "Good
Today, Better Tomorrow."

We earn revenues on the Rise installment loans, on the Rise and Elastic lines of
credit and on the Today Card credit card product. Our revenue primarily consists
of finance charges and line of credit fees. Finance charges are driven by our
average loan balances outstanding and by the average annual percentage rate
("APR") associated with those outstanding loan balances. We calculate our
average loan balances by taking a simple daily average of the ending loan
balances outstanding for each period. Line of credit fees are recognized when
they are assessed and recorded to revenue over the life of the loan. We present
certain key metrics and other information on a "combined" basis to reflect
information related to loans originated by us and by our bank partners that
license our brands, Republic Bank, FinWise Bank and Capital Community Bank
("CCB"), as well as loans originated by third-party lenders pursuant to CSO
programs, which loans originated through CSO programs are not recorded on our
balance sheet in accordance with US GAAP. See "-Key Financial and Operating
Metrics" and "-Non-GAAP Financial Measures."

We use our working capital and our credit facility with Victory Park Management,
LLC ("VPC" and the "VPC Facility") to fund the loans we directly make to our
Rise customers. The VPC Facility has a maximum total borrowing amount available
of $200 million at March 31, 2022.

We also license our Rise installment loan brand to two banks. FinWise Bank
originates Rise installment loans in 17 states. This bank initially provides all
of the funding, retains 4% of the balances of all of the loans originated and
sells the remaining 96% loan participation in those Rise installment loans to a
third-party SPV, EF SPV, Ltd. ("EF SPV"). These loan participation purchases are
funded through a separate financing facility (the "EF SPV Facility"), and
through cash flows from operations generated by EF SPV. The EF SPV Facility has
a maximum total borrowing amount available of $250 million. We do not own EF
SPV, but we have a credit default protection agreement with EF SPV whereby we
provide credit protection to the investors in EF SPV against Rise loan losses in
return for a credit premium. As the primary beneficiary, Elevate is required to
consolidate EF SPV as a variable interest entity ("VIE") under US GAAP and the
condensed consolidated financial statements include revenue, losses and loans
receivable related to the 96% of the Rise installment loans originated by
FinWise Bank and sold to EF SPV.



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Beginning in the third quarter of 2020, we also license our Rise installment
loan brand to an additional bank, CCB, which originates Rise installment loans
in three different states than FinWise Bank. Similar to the relationship with
FinWise Bank, CCB initially provides all of the funding, retains 5% of the
balances of all of the loans originated and sells the remaining 95% loan
participation in those Rise installment loans to a third-party SPV, EC SPV, Ltd.
("EC SPV"). These loan participation purchases are funded through a separate
financing facility (the "EC SPV Facility"), and through cash flows from
operations generated by EC SPV. The EC SPV Facility has a maximum total
borrowing amount available of $100 million. We do not own EC SPV, but we have a
credit default protection agreement with EC SPV whereby we provide credit
protection to the investors in EC SPV against Rise loan losses in return for a
credit premium. As the primary beneficiary, Elevate is required to consolidate
EC SPV as a VIE under US GAAP and the condensed consolidated financial
statements include revenue, losses and loans receivable related to the 95% of
the Rise installment loans originated by CCB and sold to EC SPV.

The Elastic line of credit product is originated by a third-party lender,
Republic Bank, which initially provides all of the funding for that product.
Republic Bank retains 10% of the balances of all loans originated and sells a
90% loan participation in the Elastic lines of credit. An SPV structure was
implemented such that the loan participations are sold by Republic Bank to
Elastic SPV, Ltd. ("Elastic SPV") and Elastic SPV receives its funding from VPC
in a separate financing facility (the "ESPV Facility"), which was finalized on
July 13, 2015. We do not own Elastic SPV, but we have a credit default
protection agreement with Elastic SPV whereby we provide credit protection to
the investors in Elastic SPV against Elastic loan losses in return for a credit
premium. Per the terms of this agreement, under US GAAP, we are the primary
beneficiary of Elastic SPV and are required to consolidate the financial results
of Elastic SPV as a VIE in our condensed consolidated financial statements. The
ESPV Facility has a maximum total borrowing amount available of $350 million at
March 31, 2022.

Today Card is a credit card product designed to meet the spending needs of
non-prime consumers by offering a prime customer experience. Today Card is
originated by CCB under the licensed MasterCard brand, and a 95% participation
interest in the credit card receivable is sold to us. These credit card
receivable purchases are funded through a separate financing facility (the "TSPV
Facility"), and through cash flows from operations generated by the Today Card
portfolio. The TSPV Facility has a maximum commitment amount of $50 million,
which may be increased up to $100 million. As the lowest APR product in our
portfolio, Today Card allows us to serve a broader spectrum of non-prime
Americans. The Today Card experienced significant growth in its portfolio size
despite the pandemic due to the success of our direct mail campaigns, the
primary marketing channel for acquiring new Today Card customers. We are
following a specific growth plan to grow the product while monitoring customer
responses and credit quality. Customer response to the Today Card is very
strong, as we continue to see extremely high response rates, high customer
engagement, and positive customer satisfaction scores.

In January 2022, we collaborated with Central Pacific Bank ("CPB") to invest in
the launch of a new fintech company, Swell Financial, Inc. ("Swell"). The Swell
App includes several groundbreaking features to help customers automatically
control their spending, tackle debt, and invest in exclusive private market
opportunities with as little as $1 thousand. We will help CPB and Swell offer
the Swell Credit line of credit product with APRs between 8% and 24%. Our
current total investment carrying value in Swell, using equity method
accounting, is $5.5 million and we have a non-controlling interest in Swell.

Our management evaluates our financial performance and our future strategic objectives using key indicators based primarily on the following three themes:


•Revenue growth.   Key metrics related to revenue growth that we monitor by
product include the ending and average combined loan balances outstanding, the
effective APR of our product loan portfolios, the total dollar value of loans
originated, the number of new customer loans made, the ending number of customer
loans outstanding and the related customer acquisition costs ("CAC") associated
with each new customer loan made. We include CAC as a key metric when analyzing
revenue growth (rather than as a key metric within margin expansion).

•Stable credit quality.   Since the time they were managing our legacy US
products, our management team has maintained stable credit quality across the
loan portfolio they were managing. Additionally, in the periods covered in this
Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of
Operations, we have maintained our strong credit quality. With the adoption of
fair value for the loans receivable portfolio effective January 1, 2022, the
credit quality metrics we monitor include net charge-offs as a percentage of
revenues, change in fair value of loans receivable as a percentage of revenues,
the percentage of past due combined loans receivable - principal and net
principal charge-offs as a percentage of average combined loans
receivable-principal. Prior to our adoption of fair value for the loans
receivable portfolio effective January 1, 2022, our credit quality metrics also
included the combined loan loss reserve as a percentage of outstanding combined
loans and total provision for loan losses as a percentage of revenues. Under
fair value accounting, a specific loan loss reserve is no longer required to be
recognized as a credit loss estimate is a key assumption used in measuring fair
value. See "-Non-GAAP Financial Measures" for further information.



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•Margin expansion.   We aim to manage our business to achieve a long-term
operating margin of 20%. In periods of significant loan portfolio growth, our
margins may become compressed due to the upfront costs associated with
marketing. Prior to our adoption of fair value for the loans receivable
portfolio, we incurred upfront credit provisioning expense associated with loan
portfolio growth. When applying fair value accounting, estimated credit loss is
a key assumption within the fair value assumptions used each quarter and
specific loan loss allowance is no longer required to be recognized. As we
continue to rebuild and scale our portfolio from the impacts of COVID-19, we
anticipate that our direct marketing costs primarily associated with new
customer acquisitions will be approximately 10% of revenues and our operating
expenses will decline to 20% of revenues. While our operating margins may exceed
20% in certain years, such as in 2020 when we incurred lower levels of direct
marketing expense and materially lower credit losses due to a lack of customer
demand for loans resulting from the effects of COVID-19, we do not expect our
operating margin to increase beyond that level over the long-term, as we intend
to pass on any improvements over our targeted margins to our customers in the
form of lower APRs. We believe this is a critical component of our responsible
lending platform and over time will also help us continue to attract new
customers and retain existing customers.

Choice of fair value option


Prior to January 1, 2022, we carried our combined loans receivable portfolio at
amortized cost, net of an allowance for estimated loan losses inherent in the
combined loan portfolio. Effective January 1, 2022, we elected the fair value
option to account for all our combined loan portfolio in conjunction with our
early adoption of Measurement of Credit Losses on Financial Instruments ("ASU
2016-13") and the related amendments. We believe the election of the fair value
option better reflects the value of our portfolio and its future economic
performance as well as more closely aligns with our decision-making processes
that relies on unit economics that align with discounted cash flow methodologies
that are utilized in fair value accounting. Refer to Note 1 for discussion of
the election and its impact on our accounting policies.

In accordance with the transition guidance, on January 1, 2022, we released the
allowance for loan losses and measured the combined loans receivable at fair
value at adoption. The cumulative-effect adjustment, net of tax, was recognized
collectively as a net increase of $98.6 million to opening Retained earnings.

In comparing our current period results under the fair value option to prior
periods, it may be helpful to consider that loans receivable are carried at fair
value with changes in fair value of loans receivable recorded in the Condensed
Consolidated Statements of Operations. The fair value takes into consideration
expected lifetime losses of the loans receivable, whereas the prior method
incorporated only incurred losses recognized as an allowance for loan losses. As
such, changes in credit quality, amongst other significant assumptions,
typically have a more significant impact on the carrying value of the combined
loans receivable portfolio under the fair value option. See "-Non-GAAP Financial
Measures" for further information.

Impact of COVID-19


The COVID-19 pandemic and related restrictive measures taken by governments,
businesses and individuals caused unprecedented uncertainty, volatility and
disruption in financial markets and in governmental, commercial and consumer
activity in the United States, including the markets that we serve. As the
restrictive measures have been eased in certain geographic locations, the U.S.
economy has begun to recover, and with the availability and distribution of
COVID-19 vaccines, we anticipate continued improvements in commercial and
consumer activity and the U.S. economy. While positive signs exist, we recognize
that certain of our customers are experiencing varying degrees of financial
distress, which may continue, especially if new COVID-19 variant infections
increase and new economic restrictions are mandated.

In 2020, we experienced a significant decline in the loan portfolio due to a
lack of customer demand for loans resulting from the effects of COVID-19 and
related government stimulus programs. These impacts resulted in a lower level of
direct marketing expense and materially lower credit losses during 2020 and
continuing into early 2021. Beginning in the second quarter of 2021, we
experienced a return of demand for the loan products that we, and the bank
originators we support, offer, resulting in significant growth in the loan
portfolio from that point. This significant loan portfolio growth resulted in
compressed margins in 2021 due to the upfront costs associated with marketing
and credit provisioning expense related to growing and "rebuilding" the loan
portfolio from the impacts of COVID-19. We continue to target loan portfolio
originations within our target CACs of $250-$300 and credit quality metrics of
45-55% of revenue which, when combined with our expectation of continuing
customer loan demand for our portfolio products, we believe will allow us to
return to our historical performance levels prior to COVID-19 after initially
resulting in earnings compression.



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Both we and the bank originators are closely monitoring the key credit quality
indicators such as payment defaults, continued payment deferrals, and line of
credit utilization. While we initially anticipated that the COVID-19 pandemic
would have a negative impact on our credit quality, instead the monetary
stimulus programs provided by the US government to our customer base have
generally allowed customers to continue making payments on their loans. At the
beginning of the pandemic, we expected an increase in net charge-offs as
compared to prior periods but experienced historically low net charge-offs as a
percentage of revenue in the second half of 2020 and early 2021. With the
increased volume of new customer loans we originated in the third and fourth
quarters of 2021 as we grew the loan portfolio to a level that approximated our
pre-pandemic size and the ending of government assistance, we are experiencing a
short-term increase in net charge-offs in excess of our targeted range with an
expectation of net charge-offs returning to our targeted range of 45-55% of
revenue as the portfolio becomes more seasoned with a balance of new and
returning customers, in the second half of 2022.

We have implemented a hybrid remote environment where employees may choose to
work primarily from the office or from home and gather collectively in the
office on a limited basis. We have sought to ensure our employees feel secure in
their jobs, have flexibility in their work location and have the resources they
need to stay safe and healthy. As a 100% online lending solutions provider, our
technology and underwriting platform has continued to serve our customers and
the bank originators that we support without any material interruption in
services.

COVID-19 has had a significant adverse impact on our business, and while
uncertainty still exists, we believe we are well-positioned to operate
effectively through the present economic environment and expect continued loan
portfolio growth and strong credit quality into the next year. We will continue
assessing our minimum cash and liquidity requirement, monitoring our debt
covenant compliance and implementing measures to ensure that our cash and
liquidity position is maintained through the current economic cycle.

KEY FINANCIAL AND OPERATIONAL INDICATORS


As discussed above, we regularly monitor a number of metrics in order to measure
our current performance and project our future performance. These metrics aid us
in developing and refining our growth strategies and in making strategic
decisions.

Certain of our metrics are non-GAAP financial measures. We believe that such
metrics are useful in period-to-period comparisons of our core business.
However, non-GAAP financial measures are not an alternative to any measure of
financial performance calculated and presented in accordance with US GAAP. See
"-Non-GAAP Financial Measures" for a reconciliation of our non-GAAP measures to
US GAAP.

Revenues

                                                                                        As of and for the three months ended
                                                                                                      March 31,
Revenue metrics (dollars in thousands, except as noted)                                       2022                   2021
Revenues                                                                               $     124,244            $    89,733
Period-over-period change in revenue                                                              38    %               (45) %
Ending combined loans receivable - principal(1)                                        $     511,319            $   353,089
Average combined loans receivable - principal(1)(2)                                    $     535,857            $   378,877
Total combined loans originated - principal                                            $     205,487            $   133,514
Average customer loan balance(3)                                                       $       1,993            $     1,817
Number of new customer loans                                                                  19,303                 13,890
Ending number of combined loans outstanding                                                  256,615                194,331
Customer acquisition costs                                                             $         323            $       316
Effective APR of combined loan portfolio                                                          93    %                96  %


_________

(1)Combined loans receivable is defined as loans owned by us and consolidated
VIEs plus loans originated and owned by third-party lenders pursuant to our CSO
programs. See "-Non-GAAP Financial Measures" for more information and for a
reconciliation of Combined loans receivable to Loans receivable, net, / Loans
receivable at fair value, the most directly comparable financial measures
calculated in accordance with US GAAP.
(2)Average combined loans receivable - principal is calculated using an average
of daily Combined loans receivable - principal balances.
(3)Average customer loan balance is an average of all three products and is
calculated for each product by dividing the ending Combined loans receivable -
principal by the number of loans outstanding at period end.

Revenues. Our revenue is made up of Rise finance fees, Rise CSO fees (which are fees we receive from customers who obtain a loan through the CSO program for credit services, including loan guarantee, which we provide), revenue earned on the Elastic line of credit, and finance charges and fee revenue from the Today Card credit card product. See ”Components of Our Results of Operations – Revenues”.

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Ending and average combined loans receivable - principal.   We calculate the
average combined loans receivable - principal by taking a simple daily average
of the ending combined loans receivable - principal for each period. Key metrics
that drive the ending and average combined loans receivable - principal include
the amount of loans originated in a period and the average customer loan
balance. All loan balance metrics include only the 90% participation in the
related Elastic line of credit advances (we exclude the 10% held by Republic
Bank), the 96% participation in FinWise Bank originated Rise installment loans
and the 95% participation in CCB originated Rise installment loans and the 95%
participation in the CCB originated Today Card credit card receivables, but
include the full loan balances on CSO loans, which are not presented on our
Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets.

Total combined loans originated - principal.  The amount of loans originated in
a period is driven primarily by loans to new customers as well as new loans to
prior customers, including refinancing of existing loans to customers in good
standing.

Average customer loan balance and effective APR of combined loan portfolio.
The average loan amount and its related APR are based on the product and the
underlying credit quality of the customer. Generally, better credit quality
customers are offered higher loan amounts at lower APRs. Additionally, new
customers have more potential risk of loss than prior or existing customers due
to lack of payment history and the potential for fraud. As a result, newer
customers typically will have lower loan amounts and higher APRs to compensate
for that additional risk of loss. The effective APR is calculated based on the
actual amount of finance charges generated from a customer loan divided by the
average outstanding balance for the loan and can be lower than the stated APR on
the loan due to waived finance charges and other reasons. For example, a Rise
customer may receive a $2,000 installment loan with a term of 24 months and a
stated rate of 130%. In this example, the customer's monthly installment loan
payment would be $236.72. As the customer can prepay the loan balance at any
time with no additional fees or early payment penalty, the customer pays the
loan in full in month eight. The customer's loan earns interest of $1,657.39
over the eight-month period and has an average outstanding balance of $1,912.37.
The effective APR for this loan is 130% over the eight-month period calculated
as follows:

($1,657.39 interest earned / $1,912.37 average outstanding balance) x 12 months per year = 130%

8 months


In addition, as an example for Elastic, if a customer makes a $2,500 draw on the
customer's line of credit and this draw required bi-weekly minimum payments of
5% (equivalent to 20 bi-weekly payments), and if all minimum payments are made,
the draw would earn finance charges of $1,125. The effective APR for the line of
credit in this example is 107% over the payment period and is calculated as
follows:

($1,125.00 fees earned / $1,369.05 average unpaid balance) x 26 fortnight periods per year = 107%

20 payments


The actual total revenue we realize on a loan portfolio is also impacted by the
amount of prepayments and charged-off customer loans in the portfolio. For a
single loan, on average, we typically expect to realize approximately 60% of the
revenues that we would otherwise realize if the loan were to fully amortize at
the stated APR. From the Rise example above, if we waived $350 of interest for
this customer, the effective APR for this loan would decrease to 103%. From the
Elastic example above, if we waived $125 of fees for this customer, the
effective APR for this loan would decrease to 95%.

Number of new customer loans.  We define a new customer loan as the first loan
or advance made to a customer for each of our products (so a customer receiving
a Rise installment loan and then at a later date taking their first cash advance
on an Elastic line of credit would be counted twice). The number of new customer
loans is subject to seasonal fluctuations. New customer acquisition is typically
slowest during the first six months of each calendar year, primarily in the
first quarter, compared to the latter half of the year, as our existing and
prospective customers usually receive tax refunds during this period and, thus,
have less of a need for loans from us. Further, many customers will use their
tax refunds to prepay all or a portion of their loan balance during this period,
so our overall loan portfolio typically decreases during the first quarter of
the calendar year. Overall loan portfolio growth and the number of new customer
loans tends to accelerate during the summer months (typically June and July), at
the beginning of the school year (typically late August to early September) and
during the winter holidays (typically late November to early December).

Customer acquisition costs.  A key expense metric we monitor related to loan
growth is our CAC. This metric is the amount of direct marketing costs incurred
during a period divided by the number of new customer loans originated during
that same period. New loans to former customers are not included in our
calculation of CAC (except to the extent they receive a loan through a different
product) as we believe we incur no material direct marketing costs to make
additional loans to a prior customer through the same product.



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The following tables summarize the evolution of customer loans by product for the three months ended March 31, 2022 and 2021.

                                                                   Three Months Ended March 31, 2022
                                                Rise                    Elastic                 Today
                                                                       (Lines of
                                         (Installment Loans)            Credit)             (Credit Card)             Total
Beginning number of combined
loans outstanding                              134,414                   110,628                  35,464              280,506
New customer loans originated                   12,147                     4,392                   2,764               19,303
Former customer loans originated                15,702                       136                       -               15,838
Attrition                                      (44,187)                  (12,183)                 (2,662)             (59,032)
Ending number of combined loans
outstanding                                    118,076                   102,973                  35,566              256,615
Customer acquisition cost (in
dollars)                                $          330              $        462          $           70          $       323
Average customer loan balance (in
dollars)                                $        2,341              $      1,806          $        1,376          $     1,993



                                                                   Three Months Ended March 31, 2021
                                                Rise                    Elastic                 Today
                                                                       (Lines of
                                         (Installment Loans)            Credit)             (Credit Card)             Total
Beginning number of combined
loans outstanding                              103,940                   100,105                  10,803              214,848
New customer loans originated                    8,656                     2,852                   2,382               13,890
Former customer loans originated                12,856                        94                       -               12,950
Attrition                                      (33,944)                  (13,030)                   (383)             (47,357)
Ending number of combined loans
outstanding                                     91,508                    90,021                  12,802              194,331
Customer acquisition cost (in
dollars)                                $          327              $        475          $           83          $       316
Average customer loan balance (in
dollars)                                $        2,209              $      1,514          $        1,149          $     1,817



Recent trends.  Our revenues for the three months ended March 31, 2022 totaled
$124.2 million, an increase of 38% versus the three months ended March 31, 2021.
The increase in quarterly revenue is primarily attributable to higher average
combined loans receivable-principal as we saw growth in all of our products in
the first quarter of 2022. Rise, Elastic, and the Today products experienced
year-over-year increases in revenues of 38%, 29%, and 254%, respectively, which
were attributable to increases in year-over-year average loan balances as we
focused on growing the portfolios beginning in the second half of 2021. The
Today Card balances increased significantly over the past year due to an
increase in marketing and origination activity during the second half of 2021,
and due to the nature of the product which provides an added convenience of
having a credit card for online purchases of day-to-day items such as groceries
or clothing (whereas the primary usage of a Rise installment loan or Elastic
line of credit is for emergency financial needs such as a medical deductible or
automobile repair).

We experienced an increase in new and former customers as demand for the loan
products provided by us and the bank originators increased beginning in the
second quarter of 2021 and continuing through the first quarter of 2022. This is
in contrast to 2020 and early 2021 when the portfolio of loan products
experienced significantly decreased loan demand for both new and former
customers due to COVID-19, including the effects of monetary stimulus provided
by the US government reducing demand for loan products. All three of our
products experienced an increase in principal loan balances in the first quarter
of 2022 compared to a year ago. Rise and Elastic principal loan balances at
March 31, 2022 totaled $276.4 million and $186.0 million, respectively, up
roughly $74.3 million and $49.7 million, respectively, from a year ago. Today
Card principal loan balances at March 31, 2022 totaled $48.9 million, up $34.2
million from a year ago.



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Our CAC was slightly higher in the first quarter of 2022 at $323 as compared to
the first quarter of 2021 at $316, with the first quarter CAC generally higher
than our targeted range of $250-$300 due to the seasonal decrease in loan demand
due to income tax refunds in the first quarter of each year. The new customer
loan volume is being sourced from all our marketing channels including direct
mail, strategic partners and digital. We've seen a marked improvement in loan
volume from our strategic partners channel where we have improved our technology
and risk capabilities to interface with the strategic partners via our
application programming interface (APIs) that we developed within our new
technology platform ("Blueprint"). Blueprint will allow us to more efficiently
acquire new customers within our targeted CAC range. We believe our CAC in
future quarters, and on an annual basis, will continue to remain within or below
our target range of $250 to $300 as we continue to optimize the efficiency of
our marketing channels and continue to grow the Today Card which successfully
generated new customers at a sub-$100 CAC.

Credit quality


                                                                         As 

from and for the three months ended March, 31stCredit quality measures (in thousands of dollars), after adopting fair value

                                                                      2022               2021 (Pro-forma)(6)
Net charge-offs(1)                                                       $      76,819            $           30,890
Net change in fair value(1)(6)                                                   7,340                         4,667
Total change in fair value of loans receivable (6)                       $      84,159            $           35,557

Net charge-offs as a percentage of revenues (1)                                     62    %                       34  %
Total change in fair value of loans receivable as a percentage of
revenues(6)                                                                         68    %                       40  %
Percentage past due                                                                 11    %                        6  %
Fair value premium(6)                                                               10    %                       13  %


                                                                              As of and for the three months ended
                                                                                            March 31,

Credit quality measures (in thousands of dollars), before the adoption of fair value

                                                                                    2021
Net charge-offs(2)                                                            $                      30,890
Additional provision for loan losses(2)                                                              (9,920)
Provision for loan losses                                                     $                      20,970

Total provision for loan losses as a percentage of revenues                                              23       %
Net charge-offs as a percentage of revenues(2)                                                           34       %
Percentage past due                                                                                       6       %
Combined loan loss reserve(4)                                                 $                      39,159
Combined loan loss reserve as a percentage of combined loans
receivable(3)(4)(5)                                                                                      10       %


_________

(1)Net charge-offs and net change in fair value of loans receivable are not
financial measures prepared in accordance with US GAAP. Net charge-offs include
the amount of principal and accrued interest on loans that are more than 60 days
past due (Rise and Elastic) or 120 days past due (Today Card), or sooner if we
receive notice that the loan will not be collected, such as a bankruptcy notice
or identified fraud, offset by any recoveries. Net change in fair value reflects
the adjustment recognized related to the change in the fair value mark during
the reported period. See "-Non-GAAP Financial Measures" for more information and
for a reconciliation to Change in fair value of loans receivable, the most
directly comparable financial measure calculated in accordance with US GAAP.
(2)Net charge-offs and additional provision for loan losses are not financial
measures prepared in accordance with US GAAP. Net charge-offs include the amount
of principal and accrued interest on loans that are more than 60 days past due
(Rise and Elastic) or 120 days past due (Today Card), or sooner if we receive
notice that the loan will not be collected, such as a bankruptcy notice or
identified fraud, offset by any recoveries. Additional provision for loan losses
is the amount of provision for loan losses needed for a particular period to
adjust the combined loan loss reserve to the appropriate level in accordance
with our underlying loan loss reserve methodology. See "-Non-GAAP Financial
Measures" for more information and for a reconciliation to Provision for loan
losses, the most directly comparable financial measure calculated in accordance
with US GAAP.
(3)Combined loans receivable is defined as loans owned by us and consolidated
VIEs plus loans originated and owned by third-party lenders pursuant to our CSO
programs. See "-Non-GAAP Financial Measures" for more information and for a
reconciliation of Combined loans receivable to Loans receivable, net, the most
directly comparable financial measure calculated in accordance with US GAAP.
(4)Combined loan loss reserve is defined as the loan loss reserve for loans
originated and owned by us and consolidated VIEs plus the loan loss reserve for
loans owned by third-party lenders and guaranteed by us. See "-Non-GAAP
Financial Measures" for more information and for a reconciliation of Combined
loan loss reserve to Allowance for loan losses, the most directly comparable
financial measure calculated in accordance with US GAAP.
(5)Combined loan loss reserve as a percentage of combined loans receivable is
determined using period-end balances.



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(6)We have provided pro-forma information reflecting the adoption of fair value
in the 2021 financial period to provide comparability to the 2022 financial
period. See "-Non-GAAP Financial Measures" for more information and for a
reconciliation to previously reported amounts for 2021 calculated in accordance
with US GAAP. The pro-forma fair value adjustments reflect fair value
methodology acceptable with US GAAP.

Net principal charge-offs as a percentage of
average combined loans receivable - principal                First              Second               Third              Fourth
(1)(2)(3)                                                   Quarter             Quarter             Quarter             Quarter
2022                                                          11%                 N/A                 N/A                 N/A
2021                                                          6%                  5%                  6%                  10%
2020                                                          11%                 10%                 4%                  5%


_________

(1)Net principal charge-offs is comprised of gross principal charge-offs less
recoveries.
(2)Average combined loans receivable - principal is calculated using an average
of daily Combined loans receivable - principal balances during each quarter.
(3)Combined loans receivable is defined as loans owned by us and consolidated
VIEs plus loans originated and owned by third-party lenders pursuant to our CSO
programs. See "-Non-GAAP Financial Measures" for more information and for a
reconciliation of Combined loans receivable to the most directly comparable
financial measure calculated in accordance with US GAAP.

Net principal charge-offs as a percentage of average combined loans
receivable-principal for the first quarter of 2022 is higher than the first
quarter of 2021 and consistent with this credit metric during 2019 and the first
quarter of 2020. The above chart depicts the historically low charge-off metrics
from the third quarter of 2020 through the third quarter of 2021, due to
COVID-19 pandemic impacts such as a lack of new customer demand, our
implementation of payment assistance tools, and government stimulus payments
received by our customers. Beginning in the fourth quarter of 2021, net
principal charge-offs as a percentage of average combined loans
receivable-principal have returned to the levels consistent with 2019 due to the
increased volume of new customers being originated as we rebuilt the loan
portfolio from the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic in the second half of 2021
and return to a more normalized credit profile.

Upon adoption of fair value for the combined loans receivable portfolio on
January 1, 2022, in reviewing the credit quality of our loan portfolio, we break
out our total change in fair value in loans receivable that is presented on our
Condensed Combined Statement of Operations under US GAAP into two separate
items-net charge-offs and net change in fair value. Net charge-offs are
indicative of the credit quality of our underlying portfolio, while net change
in fair value is subject to more fluctuation based on loan portfolio growth and
changes in assumptions used in the fair value methodology. The net change in
fair value is the change in the reporting period between the current period fair
value mark as compared to the beginning of period fair value mark. With all
other assumptions held flat and a fair value premium associated with the
combined loan portfolio, we would expect the net change in fair value to be
positive in periods of growth in the loan portfolio and expect the net change in
fair value to be negative in periods of attrition in the loan portfolio.

Net charge-offs. Net charge-offs comprise gross charge-offs offset by recoveries
on prior charge-offs. Gross charge-offs include the amount of principal and
accrued interest on loans that are more than 60 days past due (Rise and Elastic)
or 120 days (Today Card), or sooner if we receive notice that the loan will not
be collected, such as a bankruptcy notice or identified fraud. Any payments
received on loans that have been charged off are recorded as recoveries and
reduce the total amount of gross charge-offs. Recoveries are typically less than
10% of the amount charged off, and thus, we do not view recoveries as a key
credit quality metric.

Net charge-offs as a percentage of revenues can vary based on several factors,
such as whether or not we experience significant growth or lower the APR of our
products. Additionally, although a more seasoned portfolio will typically result
in lower net charge-offs as a percentage of revenues, we do not intend to drive
down this ratio significantly below our historical ratios and would instead seek
to offer our existing products to a broader new customer base to drive
additional revenues.

Net charge-offs as a percentage of average combined loans receivable-principal
allow us to determine credit quality and evaluate loss experience trends across
our loan portfolio.



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Net change in fair value. Beginning January 1, 2022, we utilize the fair value
option on the combined loans receivable portfolio. As such, loans receivables
are carried at fair value in the Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets with
changes in fair value recorded in the Condensed Consolidated Statements of
Operations. To derive the fair value, we generally utilize discounted cash flow
analyses that factor in estimated losses and prepayments over the estimated
duration of the underlying assets. Loss and prepayment assumptions are
determined using historical loss data and include appropriate consideration of
recent trends and anticipated future performance. Hence, another key credit
quality metric we monitor is the percentage of past due combined loans
receivable - principal, as an increase in past due loans is a consideration in
the credit loss assumption used in the fair value assumptions as a significant
increase in the percentage of past due loans may indicate a future increase in
credit loss in the portfolio. As such, changes in credit quality, amongst other
significant assumptions, typically have a more significant impact on the
carrying value of the combined loans receivable portfolio under the fair value
option. Future cash flows are discounted using a rate of return that we believe
a market participant would require. Accrued and unpaid interest and fees are
included in Loans receivable at fair value in the Condensed Consolidated Balance
Sheets.

Additional provision for loan losses.  For financial data prior to January 1,
2022, in reviewing the credit quality of our loan portfolio, we broke out our
total provision for loan losses that was presented on our statement of
operations under US GAAP into two separate items-net charge-offs (as discussed
above) and additional provision for loan losses. The additional provision for
loan losses is the amount needed to adjust the combined loan loss reserve to the
appropriate amount at the end of each month based on our loan loss reserve
methodology.

Additional provision for loan losses relates to an increase in inherent losses
in the loan portfolio as determined by our loan loss reserve methodology. This
increase could be due to a combination of factors such as an increase in the
size of the loan portfolio or a worsening of credit quality or increase in past
due loans. It is also possible for the additional provision for loan losses for
a period to be a negative amount, which would reduce the amount of the combined
loan loss reserve needed (due to a decrease in the loan portfolio or improvement
in credit quality). The amount of additional provision for loan losses is
seasonal in nature, mirroring the seasonality of our new customer acquisition
and overall loan portfolio growth, as discussed above. The combined loan loss
reserve typically decreased during the first quarter or first half of the
calendar year due to a decrease in the loan portfolio from year end. Then, as
the rate of growth for the loan portfolio started to increase during the second
half of the year, additional provision for loan losses was typically needed to
increase the reserve for losses associated with the loan growth. Because of
this, our provision for loan losses varied significantly throughout the year
without a significant change in the credit quality of our portfolio.

Loan loss reserve methodology prior to January 1, 2022.  Our loan loss reserve
methodology was calculated separately for each product and, in the case of Rise
loans originated under the state lending model (including CSO program loans),
was calculated separately based on the state in which each customer resides to
account for varying state license requirements that affect the amount of the
loan offered, repayment terms and other factors. For each product, loss factors
were calculated based on the delinquency status of customer loan balances:
current, 1 to 30 days past due, 31 to 60 days past due or 61-120 past due (for
Today Card only). These loss factors for loans in each delinquency status were
based on average historical loss rates by product (or state) associated with
each of these three delinquency categories.

Recent trends.  Total change in fair value of loans receivable for the three
months ended March 31, 2022 and pro-forma three months ended March 31, 2021, was
68% and 40% of revenues, respectively, (See "-Non-GAAP Financial Measures" for
more information and for a reconciliation to previously reported amounts for
2021 calculated in accordance with US GAAP.). Net charge-offs as a percentage of
revenues for the three months ended March 31, 2022 and 2021 were 62% and 34%,
respectively. The increase in net charge-offs as a percentage of revenues is due
to the increase in originations beginning in the second half of 2021 with a
heavier mix of new customers into the loan portfolio which have a higher credit
loss profile than returning customers. We expect the second quarter net
charge-offs as a percentage of revenue to be at the high end of our target range
of 45-55% of revenue and will return within our target range during the second
half of 2022 as the mix of new and returning customers in the portfolio
normalizes. We continue to monitor the portfolio during the economic recovery
resulting from COVID-19 and recent macro-economic factors and will adjust our
underwriting and credit policies to mitigate any potential negative impacts as
needed.

Past due loan balances at March 31, 2022 were 11% of total combined loans
receivable-principal, up from 6% from a year ago, due to the number of new
customers originated beginning in the second quarter of 2021 which is consistent
with our historical past due percentages prior to the pandemic. We, and the bank
originators we support, are no longer offering specific COVID-19 payment
deferral programs but continue to offer other payment flexibility programs if
certain qualifications are met. We are continuing to see that most customers are
meeting their scheduled payments once they exit the payment deferral program.



                                       47
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Net change in fair value as a percentage of revenue was 6% for both March 31,
2022 and pro-forma March 31, 2021, as the fair value premium was relatively flat
with the fair value premiums calculated during the prior reporting periods (See
"-Non-GAAP Financial Measures" for more information and for a reconciliation to
previously reported amounts for 2021 calculated in accordance with US GAAP.).
The fair value premium of the combined loans receivable-principal portfolio was
10% at March 31, 2022 compared to 13% at March 31, 2021 due to the composition
of the loan portfolio with an increased mix of newly originated loans at March
31, 2022 as compared to a more mature loan portfolio at March 31, 2021 due to
limited origination activity and significant paydowns experienced in the
portfolio due to the effects of COVID-19. The key assumptions used in the fair
value estimate at March 31, 2022 and 2021 are as follows:

                         March 31, 2022
Credit loss rate                   17  %
Prepayment rate                    27  %
Discount rate                      21  %



Total loan loss provision for the three months ended March 31, 2021, and prior
to the adoption of fair value, which was below our targeted range of
approximately 45% to 55%, was 23% of revenues. Net charge-offs as a percentage
of revenues for the three months ended March 31, 2021 was 34% due to reduced
demand and limited loan origination activity in 2020 and early 2021 coupled with
customers' receipt of monetary stimulus provided by the US government which
allowed customers to continue making payments on their loans.

The combined loan loss reserve as a percentage of combined loans receivable
totaled 10% as of March 31, 2021. The lower historical combined loan loss
reserve rate reflects the strong credit performance of the portfolio at March
31, 2021 due to the mature nature of the portfolio resulting from limited new
loan origination activity in 2020 and early 2021.



                                       48
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We also look at Rise and Elastic principal loan charge-offs (including both
credit and fraud losses) by loan vintage as a percentage of combined loans
originated-principal. As the below table shows, our cumulative principal loan
charge-offs for Rise and Elastic through March 31, 2022 for each annual vintage
since the 2013 vintage are generally under 30% and continue to generally trend
at or slightly below our 20% to 25% long-term targeted range. Our payment
deferral programs and monetary stimulus programs provided by the US government
in response to the COVID-19 pandemic have also assisted in reducing losses in
our 2019 and 2020 vintages coupled with a lower volume of new loan originations
in our 2020 vintage. While still early, we would expect the 2021 vintage to be
at or near 2018 levels or slightly lower given the increased volume of new
customer loans originated during the second half of 2021. It is also possible
that the cumulative loss rates on all vintages will increase and may exceed our
recent historical cumulative loss experience due to the economic impact of a
prolonged crisis resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic or the current
inflationary environment.[[Image Removed: elvt-20220331_g2.jpg]]

_________

1) The 2020 and 2021 vintages are not yet fully ripe from the point of view of losses. 2) UK included in 2013 to 2017 vintages only.



We also look at Today Card principal loan charge-offs (including both credit and
fraud losses) by account vintage as a percentage of account principal
originations. As the below table shows, our cumulative principal credit card
charge-offs through March 31, 2022 for the 2020 annual vintage is under 8%.
While our 2021 account vintage is currently performing better than 2020, we
expect the 2021 account vintage to have losses higher than the 2020 account
vintage based on the volume of new customers originated in the second half of
2021 and the performance of certain segments upon the release of the credit
model during 2021. The Today Card requires accounts to be charged off that are
more than 120 days past due which results in a longer maturity period for the
cumulative loss curve related to this portfolio. Our 2018 and 2019 vintages are
considered to be test vintages and were comprised of limited originations volume
and not reflective of our current underwriting standards.



                                       49
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[[Image Removed: elvt-20220331_g3.jpg]]

Margins

                                                    Three Months Ended March 31,
Margin metrics (dollars in thousands)               2022                       2021
Revenues                                     $      124,244                 $ 89,733
Net charge-offs(1)                                  (76,819)                 (30,890)
Change in fair value(1)                              (7,340)                       -
Additional provision for loan losses(1)                   -                    9,920
Direct marketing costs                               (6,226)                  (4,383)
Other cost of sales                                  (2,882)                  (2,047)
Gross profit                                         30,977                   62,333
Operating expenses                                  (38,281)                 (37,594)
Operating income (loss)                      $       (7,304)                $ 24,739
As a percentage of revenues:
Net charge-offs                                          62   %                   34  %
Change in fair value                                      6                 

Additional provision for loan losses                      -                      (11)
Direct marketing costs                                    5                        5
Other cost of sales                                       2                        2
Gross margin                                             25                       69
Operating expenses                                       31                       42
Operating margin                                         (6)  %                   28  %


_________

(1) Non-GAAP measure. See “-Non-GAAP Financial Measures – Net Write-offs and Net Change in Fair Value” and “-Non-GAAP Financial Measures – Net Write-offs and Additional Allowance for Loan Losses”.

                                       50
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Gross margin is calculated as revenues minus cost of sales, or gross profit,
expressed as a percentage of revenues, and operating margin is calculated as
operating income expressed as a percentage of revenues. Due to the negative
impact of COVID-19 on our loan balances and revenue, we are monitoring our
profit margins closely. Long-term, we intend to continue to manage the business
to a targeted 20% operating margin.

Recent operating margin trends.  For the three months ended March 31, 2022, our
operating margin was (6)%, which was a decrease from 28% in the prior year
period, as originally reported, and a decrease of 11% on a pro-forma basis
considering the pro-forma adoption of fair value at the beginning of 2021 (See
"-Non-GAAP Financial Measures" for more information and for a reconciliation to
previously reported amounts for 2021 calculated in accordance with US GAAP.).
The margin decreases we are experiencing in 2022 are primarily driven by the
increased net charge-offs in the first quarter of 2022 due to a higher volume of
new customers originated in the loan portfolio during the second half of 2021 as
we rebuilt the portfolio from the impacts of COVID-19. As the portfolio matures
and we manage the mix of new and returning customers to the portfolio, we would
expect our net charge-offs to return to our target range of 45-55% and our gross
margin to normalize in future periods with our past historical performance. The
margins achieved in the first quarter of 2021 are not reflective of our
historical performance due to the limited origination activity in the loan
portfolio during 2020 and early 2021 due to a lack of customer demand resulting
from the effects of COVID-19 and related government stimulus programs. These
impacts resulted in a lower level of direct marketing expense and materially
lower credit losses during the first quarter of 2021 leading to an outsized
gross margin for the period.

Our operating expense metrics have been negatively impacted by the COVID-19
pandemic and its impact on loan balances and revenue. We began to see
improvements in our operating expense metric in the third and fourth quarter of
2021 due to the growth in the portfolio and associated increase in revenue
during those periods as we continued to manage and maintain a relatively
consistent operating expense during the latter half of the year and into the
first quarter of 2022. In the short term, with the continued growth in the loan
portfolio expected in 2022, we expect our expense metrics to continue to improve
and move toward our target range as we focus on growth to increase our new and
former customer loan volume and continue to scale the overall loan portfolio. In
the long term, as we grow the loan portfolio while actively managing our
operating expenses, we expect to see our operating expense metrics return to
approximately 20% of revenue.

NON-GAAP FINANCIAL MEASURES


We believe that the inclusion of the following non-GAAP financial measures in
this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q can provide a useful measure for
period-to-period comparisons of our core business, provide transparency and
useful information to investors and others in understanding and evaluating our
operating results, and enable investors to better compare our operating
performance with the operating performance of our competitors. Management uses
these non-GAAP financial measures frequently in its decision-making because they
provide supplemental information that facilitates internal comparisons to the
historical operating performance of prior periods and give an additional
indication of our core operating performance. However, non-GAAP financial
measures are not a measure calculated in accordance with US generally accepted
accounting principles, or US GAAP, and should not be considered an alternative
to any measures of financial performance calculated and presented in accordance
with US GAAP. Other companies may calculate these non-GAAP financial measures
differently than we do.


Adjusted EBITDA and Adjusted EBITDA margin

Adjusted EBITDA represents our net income (loss) adjusted to exclude:

• Net interest expense primarily associated with notes payable under credit facilities used to fund loan portfolios;

•Remuneration in shares;

• Depreciation of fixed assets and intangible assets;

• Gains or losses from an investment using the equity method;

•Settlement related to litigation included in non-operating income; and

•Income taxes.

Adjusted EBITDA margin is Adjusted EBITDA divided by revenue.


Management believes that Adjusted EBITDA and Adjusted EBITDA margin are useful
supplemental measures to assist management and investors in analyzing the
operating performance of the business and provide greater transparency into the
results of operations of our core business.



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Adjusted EBITDA and Adjusted EBITDA margin should not be considered as
alternatives to net income (loss) or any other performance measure derived in
accordance with US GAAP. Our use of Adjusted EBITDA and Adjusted EBITDA margin
has limitations as an analytical tool, and you should not consider it in
isolation or as a substitute for analysis of our results as reported under US
GAAP. Some of these limitations are:

•Although depreciation and amortization are non-cash charges, the assets being
depreciated and amortized may have to be replaced in the future, and Adjusted
EBITDA does not reflect expected cash capital expenditure requirements for such
replacements or for new capital assets;

•Adjusted EBITDA does not reflect changes or cash requirements for our working capital requirements; and


•Adjusted EBITDA does not reflect interest associated with notes payable used
for funding the loan portfolios, for other corporate purposes or tax payments
that may represent a reduction in cash available to us.

The following table provides a reconciliation of net earnings (loss) to Adjusted EBITDA and Adjusted EBITDA margin for each of the periods indicated:

                                          Three Months Ended March 31,
(Dollars in thousands)                    2022                       2021
Net income (loss)                  $      (13,923)                $ 12,716
Adjustments:
Net interest expense                       12,170                    8,786
Share-based compensation                    1,658                    1,602

Depreciation and amortization               3,761                    5,243

Equity method investment loss                 344                        -
Non-operating income                       (1,666)                    (207)
Income tax expense (benefit)               (4,229)                   3,444
Adjusted EBITDA                    $       (1,885)                $ 31,584

Adjusted EBITDA margin                       (1.5)  %                 35.2  %

Unaudited pro forma condensed consolidated financial information


The following unaudited pro-forma condensed consolidated statement of operations
information reflects the adoption of ASU 2016-13 as of January 1, 2021.
Management has made significant estimates and assumptions in its determination
of the pro-forma accounting adjustments based on certain currently available
information and certain assumptions and methodologies that we believe are
reasonable and consistent with US GAAP. Management believes the pro-forma
financial information is a useful supplemental measure to assist management and
investors in analyzing the operating performance of the business and provide
greater transparency into the results of operations of our core business.



                                       52
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Three months completed March 31, 2021

                                                                                       Fair value          Pro-forma financial
(Dollars in thousands)                                    As reported                 adjustments              information
Revenues                                                $     89,733                $           -          $       89,733
Cost of sales:
Provision for loan losses                                     20,970                      (20,970)                      -
Change in fair value of loans receivable                           -                       35,557                  35,557
Direct marketing and other costs of sales                      6,430                            -                   6,430
Total costs of sales                                          27,400                       14,587                  41,987
Gross profit                                                  62,333                      (14,587)                 47,746
Total operating expenses                                      37,594                            -                  37,594
Operating income                                              24,739                      (14,587)                 10,152

Total other expense                                           (8,579)                           -                  (8,579)
Income before taxes                                           16,160                      (14,587)                  1,573
Income tax expense                                             3,444                       (2,940)                    504
Net income                                              $     12,716                $     (11,647)         $        1,069

Basic earnings per share                                $       0.35                $       (0.32)         $         0.03
Diluted earnings per share                              $       0.34                $       (0.31)         $         0.03

Adjusted EBITDA                                         $     31,584                $     (14,587)         $       16,997
Adjusted EBITDA margin                                          35.2   %                                             18.9     %


Free cash flow

Free cash flow (“FCF”) represents our net cash provided by operating activities, adjusted to include:

• Net write-offs – capital loans combined; and

• Capital expenditures.

The following table presents a reconciliation of the net cash provided by operating activities to the FCF for each of the periods indicated:

                                                         Three Months Ended March 31,
(Dollars in thousands)                                        2022                    2021

Net cash from operating activities(1) $49,935

        $ 31,880
Adjustments:
Net charge-offs - combined principal loans                 (59,793)                 (22,632)
Capital expenditures                                        (6,277)                  (3,383)
FCF                                               $        (16,135)                $  5,865


 _________

(1) Net cash from operating activities includes net charges – combined finance costs.




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Net charges and net change in fair value


We break out our total change in fair value into two separate items-first, the
amount related to net charge-offs, and second, net change in fair value needed
to adjust the current period fair value mark from the fair value mark from the
beginning of the reporting period. We believe this presentation provides more
detail related to the components of our total change in fair value when
analyzing the gross margin of our business.

Net charge-offs.  Net charge-offs comprise gross charge-offs offset by
recoveries on prior charge-offs. Gross charge-offs include the amount of
principal and accrued interest on loans that are more than 60 days past due
(Rise and Elastic) or 120 days (Today Card), or sooner if we receive notice that
the loan will not be collected, such as a bankruptcy notice or identified fraud.
Any payments received on loans that have been charged off are recorded as
recoveries and reduce total gross charge-offs.

Net change in fair value.  The net change in fair value is the change in the
reporting period between the current period fair value mark as compared to the
beginning of period fair value mark. With all other assumptions held flat and
fair value premium associated with the combined loan portfolio, we would expect
the net change in fair value to be positive in periods of growth in the loan
portfolio and expect the net change in fair value to be negative in periods of
attrition in the loan portfolio.

                                                                                Three Months Ended March 31,
(Dollars in thousands)                                                       2022                2021 (pro-forma)(1)

Net charge-offs                                                       $        76,819          $             30,890
Net change in fair value                                                        7,340                         4,667
Total change in fair value of loans receivable                        $        84,159          $             35,557


_________

(1)We have provided pro-forma information reflecting the adoption of fair value
in the 2021 financial period to provide comparability to the 2022 financial
period. See "-Non-GAAP Financial Measures" for more information and for a
reconciliation to previously reported amounts for 2021 calculated in accordance
with US GAAP. The pro-forma fair value adjustments reflect fair value
methodology acceptable with US GAAP.

Net write-offs and additional provision for loan losses


We break out our total provision for loan losses into two separate items-first,
the amount related to net charge-offs, and second, the additional provision for
loan losses needed to adjust the combined loan loss reserve to the appropriate
amount at the end of each month based on our loan loss provision methodology. We
believe this presentation provides more detail related to the components of our
total provision for loan losses when analyzing the gross margin of our business.

Net charge-offs.  Net charge-offs comprise gross charge-offs offset by
recoveries on prior charge-offs. Gross charge-offs include the amount of
principal and accrued interest on loans that are more than 60 days past due
(Rise and Elastic) or 120 days (Today Card), or sooner if we receive notice that
the loan will not be collected, such as a bankruptcy notice or identified fraud.
Any payments received on loans that have been charged off are recorded as
recoveries and reduce total gross charge-offs.

Additional provision for loan losses.  Additional provision for loan losses is
the amount of provision for loan losses needed for a particular period to adjust
the combined loan loss reserve to the appropriate level in accordance with our
underlying loan loss reserve methodology.

                                                 Three Months Ended March 31,
(Dollars in thousands)                                       2021

Net charge-offs                                 $                      30,890
Additional provision for loan losses                                   (9,920)
Provision for loan losses                       $                      20,970


Combined loan information

The Elastic line of credit product is originated by a third-party lender,
Republic Bank, which initially provides all of the funding for that product.
Republic Bank retains 10% of the balances of all of the loans originated and
sells a 90% loan participation in the Elastic lines of credit to a third-party
SPV, Elastic SPV, Ltd. Elevate is required to consolidate Elastic SPV, Ltd. as a
VIE under US GAAP and the condensed consolidated financial statements include
revenue, losses and loans receivable related to the 90% of Elastic lines of
credit originated by Republic Bank and sold to Elastic SPV.



                                       54
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Beginning in the fourth quarter of 2018, we started licensing our Rise
installment loan brand to a third-party lender, FinWise Bank, which originates
Rise installment loans in 17 states. FinWise Bank retains 4% of the balances of
all the loans originated and sells a 96% participation to a third-party SPV, EF
SPV, Ltd. We do not own EF SPV, but we are required to consolidate EF SPV as a
VIE under US GAAP and the condensed consolidated financial statements include
revenue, losses and loans receivable related to the 96% of Rise installment
loans originated by FinWise Bank and sold to EF SPV.

Beginning in 2018, we started licensing the Today Card brand and our
underwriting services and platform to launch a credit card product originated by
CCB, which initially provides all of the funding for that product. CCB retains
5% of the credit card receivable balance of all the receivables originated and
sells a 95% participation in the Today Card credit card receivables to us. The
Today Card program began expanding in 2020.

Beginning in the third quarter of 2020, we also license our Rise installment
loan brand to an additional bank, CCB, which originates Rise installment loans
in three different states than FinWise Bank. Similar to the relationship with
FinWise Bank, CCB retains 5% of the balances of all of the loans originated and
sells the remaining 95% loan participation in those Rise installment loans to EC
SPV. We do not own EC SPV, but we are required to consolidate EC SPV as a VIE
under US GAAP and the condensed consolidated financial statements include
revenue, losses and loans receivable related to the 95% of the Rise installment
loans originated by CCB and sold to EC SPV.

The information presented in the tables below on a combined basis are non-GAAP
measures based on a combined portfolio of loans, which includes the total amount
of outstanding loans receivable that we own and that are on our balance sheets
plus outstanding loans receivable originated and owned by third parties that we
guarantee pursuant to CSO programs in which we participate. There were no new
loan originations in 2021 under our CSO programs, but we continued to have
obligations as the CSO until the wind-down of this portfolio was completed in
the third quarter of 2021. See "-Basis of Presentation and Critical Accounting
Policies-Allowance and liability for estimated losses on consumer loans."

We believe these non-GAAP measures provide investors with important information
needed to evaluate the magnitude of potential loan losses and the opportunity
for revenue performance of the combined loan portfolio on an aggregate basis. We
also believe that the comparison of the combined amounts from period to period
is more meaningful than comparing only the amounts reflected on our balance
sheet since both revenues and cost of sales as reflected in our financial
statements are impacted by the aggregate amount of loans we own and those CSO
loans we guaranteed.

Our use of total combined loans and fees receivable has limitations as an
analytical tool, and you should not consider it in isolation or as a substitute
for analysis of our results as reported under US GAAP. Some of these limitations
are:

• Rise CSO loans were originated and held by a third party lender; and

• The Rise CSO loans were funded by a third party lender and were not part of the VPC Facility.

At each of the period ends indicated, the following table presents a reconciliation of:

•Loans receivable, net and at fair value, held by the Company (which correspond to our condensed consolidated balance sheets included elsewhere in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q);


•Loans receivable, net, guaranteed by the Company (as disclosed in Note 3 of our
condensed consolidated financial statements included elsewhere in this Quarterly
Report on Form 10-Q);

•Loans receivable combined (which we use as a non-GAAP measure); and

•Combined loan loss reserve (which we use as a non-GAAP measure).

                                       55
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                                                                                       2021                                              2022
(Dollars in thousands)                                 March 31           June 30           September 30          December 31          March 31
Company Owned Loans:
Loans receivable - principal, current, company
owned                                                $ 331,251          $ 

372,068 $466,140 $501,552 $457,259
Loans receivable – principal, overdue, company property

                                           21,678             27,231                46,730              57,207             54,060
Loans receivable - principal, total, company
owned                                                  352,929            399,299               512,870             558,759            511,319
Loans receivable - finance charges, company
owned                                                   21,393             19,157                22,960              23,602             22,991
Loans receivable - company owned                       374,322            418,456               535,830             582,361            534,310
Allowance for loan losses on loans receivable,
company owned(5)                                       (39,037)           (40,314)              (56,209)            (71,204)                 -
Fair value adjustment, loans receivable-
principal                                                    -                  -                     -                   -             49,844
Loans receivable, net, company owned / Loans
receivable at fair value                             $ 335,285          $ 378,142          $    479,621          $  511,157          $ 584,154
Third Party Loans Guaranteed by the Company:
Loans receivable - principal, current,
guaranteed by company                                $     145          $   

$17 – $ – $ – Loans receivable – principal, past due, company guaranteed

                                       15                  4                     -                   -                  -
Loans receivable - principal, total,
guaranteed by company(1)                                   160                 21                     -                   -                  -
Loans receivable - finance charges, guaranteed
by company(2)                                               22                  4                     -                   -                  -
Loans receivable - guaranteed by company                   182                 25                     -                   -                  -
Liability for losses on loans receivable,
guaranteed by company                                     (122)                (7)                    -                   -                  -
Loans receivable, net, guaranteed by
company(3)                                           $      60          $      18          $          -          $        -          $       -
Combined Loans Receivable(3):
Combined loans receivable - principal, current       $ 331,396          $ 372,085          $    466,140          $  501,552          $ 457,259
Combined loans receivable - principal, past
due                                                     21,693             27,235                46,730              57,207             54,060
Combined loans receivable - principal                  353,089            399,320               512,870             558,759            511,319
Combined loans receivable - finance charges             21,415             19,161                22,960              23,602             22,991
Combined loans receivable                            $ 374,504          $ 418,481          $    535,830          $  582,361          $ 534,310
Combined Loan Loss Reserve(3):
Allowance for loan losses on loans receivable,
company owned(5)                                     $ (39,037)         $ 

(40,314) ($56,209) ($71,204) $ – Liability for losses on loans receivable, guaranteed by the company

                                     (122)                (7)                    -                   -                  -
Combined loan loss reserve(5)                        $ (39,159)         $ 

(40,321) ($56,209) ($71,204) $ – Combined Loans Receivable – Principal, Overdue(3)

                                               $  21,693          $  

27,235 $46,730 $57,207 $54,060
Combined loans receivable – principal(3)

               353,089            399,320               512,870             558,759            511,319
Percentage past due(1)                                       6  %               7  %                  9  %               10  %              11  %
Combined loan loss reserve as a percentage of
combined loans receivable(3)(4)(5)                          10  %              10  %                 11  %               12  %               -  %
Allowance for loan losses as a percentage of
loans receivable - company owned(5)                         10  %              10  %                 11  %               12  %               -  %
Fair value adjustment, combined loans
receivable- principal(6)                             $  44,458          $  

51,078 $50,036 $57,184 $49,844


Combined loans receivable at fair value(6)             418,962            469,559               585,866             639,545            584,154
Fair value as a percentage of combined loans
receivable- principal(3)(6)                                113  %             113  %                110  %              110  %             110  %


_________
(1)Represents loans originated by third-party lenders through the CSO programs,
which are not included in our condensed consolidated financial statements. The
wind-down of the CSO program was completed in the third quarter of 2021.
(2)Represents finance charges earned by third-party lenders through the CSO
programs, which are not included in our condensed consolidated financial
statements. The wind-down of the CSO program was completed in the third quarter
of 2021.
(3)Non-GAAP measure
(4)Combined loan loss reserve as a percentage of combined loans receivable is
determined using period-end balances.
(5)Effective January 1, 2022, upon the election to carry the loan portfolio at
fair value, a combined loan loss reserve and allowance for loan losses is no
longer required as a loan loss assumption has been included in the fair value
assumptions for the loan portfolio.
(6)The periods of March 31, 2021 to December 31, 2021 include pro-forma
adjustments reflecting the combined loans receivable at fair value consistent
with a fair value methodology acceptable with U.S. GAAP.





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COMPONENTS OF OUR OPERATING RESULTS

Revenue


Our revenues are composed of Rise finance charges and CSO fees (inclusive of
finance charges attributable to the participation in Rise installment loans
originated by FinWise Bank and CCB), cash advance fees attributable to the
participation in Elastic lines of credit that we consolidate, finance charges
and fee revenues related to the Today Card credit card product (inclusive of
finance charges attributable to the participations in the credit card
receivables originated by CCB), and marketing and licensing fees received from
third-party lenders related to the Rise, Rise CSO, Elastic, and Today Card
products. See "-Overview" above for further information on the structure of
Elastic.

Cost of sales


Change in Fair value. Beginning January 1, 2022, we elected the fair value
option for our loans receivable portfolio. As such, loans receivable are carried
at fair value in the Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets with changes in fair
value recorded in the Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations. To derive
the fair value, we generally utilize discounted cash flow analyses that factor
in estimated losses and prepayments over the estimated duration of the
underlying assets. Loss and prepayment assumptions are determined using
historical loss data and include appropriate consideration of recent trends and
anticipated future performance. Future cash flows are discounted using a rate of
return that we believe a market participant would require.

Provision for loan losses. Prior to January 1, 2022, provision for loan losses
consists of amounts charged against income during the period related to net
charge-offs and the additional provision for loan losses needed to adjust the
loan loss reserve to the appropriate amount at the end of each month based on
our loan loss methodology.

Direct marketing costs.  Direct marketing costs consist of online marketing
costs such as sponsored search and advertising on social networking sites, and
other marketing costs such as purchased television and radio advertising and
direct mail print advertising. In addition, direct marketing cost includes
affiliate costs paid to marketers in exchange for referrals of potential
customers. All direct marketing costs are expensed as incurred.

Other cost of sales. Other costs of sales include data verification costs associated with signing up prospective customers and Automated Clearing House (“ACH”) transaction costs associated with funding and making loan payments to customers.

Operating Expenses


Operating expenses consist of compensation and benefits, professional services,
selling and marketing, occupancy and equipment, depreciation and amortization as
well as other miscellaneous expenses.

Benefits and compensation. Salaries and personnel costs, including benefits, bonuses and stock-based compensation expenses, constitute the majority of our operating expenses and these costs are determined by our number of employees.


Professional services.  These operating expenses include costs associated with
legal, accounting and auditing, recruiting and outsourced customer support and
collections.

Selling and marketing.  Selling and marketing costs include costs associated
with the use of agencies that perform creative services and monitor and measure
the performance of the various marketing channels. Selling and marketing costs
also include the production costs associated with media advertisements that are
expensed as incurred over the licensing or production period. These expenses do
not include direct marketing costs incurred to acquire customers, which
comprises CAC.

Occupancy and equipment. Occupancy and equipment includes rental charges for our leased facilities, as well as telephony and web hosting charges.


Depreciation and amortization.  We capitalize all acquisitions of property and
equipment of $500 or greater as well as certain software development costs.
Costs incurred in the preliminary stages of software development are expensed.
Costs incurred thereafter, including external direct costs of materials and
services as well as payroll and payroll-related costs, are capitalized.
Post-development costs are expensed. Depreciation is computed using the
straight-line method over the estimated useful lives of the depreciable assets.








                                       57
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Other expenses


Net interest expense.  Net interest expense primarily includes the interest
expense associated with the VPC Facility that funds the Rise installment loans,
the ESPV Facility related to the Elastic lines of credit and related Elastic SPV
entity, the EF SPV and EC SPV Facilities that fund Rise installment loans
originated by FinWise Bank and CCB, respectively, the TSPV facility used to fund
credit card receivable purchases, and the Pine Hill subordinated debt facility
used to fund working capital. Interest expense also includes any amortization of
deferred debt issuance cost and prepayment penalties incurred associated with
the debt facilities.

Gain or loss on investment using the equity method. Investment loss under the equity method includes our share of profit or loss associated with an investment in an unconsolidated subsidiary beginning in the first quarter of 2022.

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County to add paid parental leave for employees, but will it be enough? https://computerchip7.com/county-to-add-paid-parental-leave-for-employees-but-will-it-be-enough/ Mon, 02 May 2022 05:05:26 +0000 https://computerchip7.com/county-to-add-paid-parental-leave-for-employees-but-will-it-be-enough/ Monday, May 2, 2022 by Seth Smalley Tomorrow, the Travis County Commissioners Court will take action on a paid parental leave policy for all workers in the county, but with several policies still to choose from, the scope and impact of how they decide remains unclear. . While county staff will present a menu of […]]]>

Monday, May 2, 2022 by Seth Smalley

Tomorrow, the Travis County Commissioners Court will take action on a paid parental leave policy for all workers in the county, but with several policies still to choose from, the scope and impact of how they decide remains unclear. .

While county staff will present a menu of options to the court, with varying durations of benefits, eligibility requirements and costs, they are expected recommend the option of six weeks of paid parental leave that is “consistent with market conditions”, according to a publicly available PowerPoint presentation on the matter. (Commissioners asked county staff to review the matter in February.)

Another resolution on the same problem, highlighted by County Judge Andy Brown, proposes eight weeks of PPL instead of six and shortens the eligibility requirement from 12 months of employment with the county to six.

“I have lived what it means to have a newborn baby at home and how exhausting, time-consuming, important and joyful this time is,” said Stephanie Gharakhanian, a county worker who advocated for the furlough. parental. austin monitor. “I also met other employees who had to leave the county because they just couldn’t make things work.”

Gharakhanian has one child and plans to have another. She has worked in the county for about six months and previously worked for a nonprofit that provided paid parental leave for its employees.

“Honestly, I don’t know how my family would have fared if we didn’t have a paycheck while I was on leave and were still paying rent or paying our mortgage or student loans,” Gharakhanian said. . “I’ve met people who had to take out really predatory title loans back when they were out of work (to care for a newborn) because they still have to pay their bills.”

The city of Houston already has a policy in place providing up to 12 weeks of paid leave “for the birth, adoption or fostering of a child”, and Harris County – which represents a much more conservative constituency that Travis County – is phasing in a 12-week policy by 2023 (which started with eight weeks in 2021). Harris County’s policy offers the benefits after just six months of employment, while Travis County’s draft policy appears to align more closely with the nearly decade-old Austin policy making the benefits available after 12 months of continuous employment, in accordance with Federal and Medical Family. Leave of Absence Act (FMLA) requirements. (Austin’s six-week paid parental leave policy has been in place since 2013, though that period may soon be extended by a city council resolution proposed this Thursday.)

According to data analyzed by the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development, the United States was the only country, out of 41 studied, that lacked parental leave. Even 12-week leave policies in Houston and Harris County seem rare compared to the nearly 70% of countries surveyed that get 20 weeks or more.

Bob Libal, a former candidate for county commissioner, noted on Twitter that the lack of such a policy in Travis County is a “headache.” Another commenter, whose profile said he was a Houston firefighter, expressed shock that Houston implemented a 12-week policy ahead of Travis County.

Photo made available via a Creative Commons license.

Editor’s Note: Andy Brown is a member of the board of directors of the Capital of Texas Media Foundation, the nonprofit parent association of the austin monitor.

the austin monitorThe work of is made possible through donations from the community. Although our reports occasionally cover donors, we are careful to separate commercial and editorial efforts while maintaining transparency. A full list of donors is available here, and our code of ethics is explained here.

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How to save more, even as inflation bites into income https://computerchip7.com/how-to-save-more-even-as-inflation-bites-into-income/ Sun, 01 May 2022 13:01:11 +0000 https://computerchip7.com/how-to-save-more-even-as-inflation-bites-into-income/ Saving money could become more difficult in the coming months, with inflation a problem and tens of millions of Americans without even a modest emergency fund. Tax season is over, which means two out of three Americans have recently received a refund, which is a nice cushion. But for many people, the hard work starts […]]]>

Saving money could become more difficult in the coming months, with inflation a problem and tens of millions of Americans without even a modest emergency fund.

Tax season is over, which means two out of three Americans have recently received a refund, which is a nice cushion. But for many people, the hard work starts now.

Here are several tactics and strategies, some quite simple, that could make saving easier.

Reframing the problem

Workplace 401(k)-style plans can be a great way to accumulate money, combining tax advantages and employer matching funds with the convenience of diverting money from every paycheck. . But many people still underuse these programs, perhaps because they don’t understand what it entails.

Participants in 401(k) programs must start by deciding what percentage of each paycheck they want to save, but the percentages confuse many people, according to a study by researchers at Carnegie Mellon University, Cornell University and UCLA. Rather than talking about percentage savings, employers could encourage participation if they explained it by giving up a penny or two of every dollar earned.

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How they work, cost, alternatives https://computerchip7.com/how-they-work-cost-alternatives/ Fri, 29 Apr 2022 08:41:40 +0000 https://computerchip7.com/how-they-work-cost-alternatives/ Title loans use your car as collateral, which means the lender can repossess your car if you don’t pay. Title loans often have to be repaid within 15 to 30 days and charge interest rates of around 300%. Alternatives to title loans include credit cards, personal loans, side gigs, and local charities. Loading Something is […]]]>
  • Title loans use your car as collateral, which means the lender can repossess your car if you don’t pay.
  • Title loans often have to be repaid within 15 to 30 days and charge interest rates of around 300%.
  • Alternatives to title loans include credit cards, personal loans, side gigs, and local charities.

A title loan is a short-term, high-interest loan that uses your car title as collateral when you borrow money. This means the lender can repossess your car if you don’t repay your loan on time. Many title lenders don’t consider your credit history at all when making lending decisions.

If you’re in a bind, have poor credit, and need cash fast, a title loan might seem like an attractive option to get your money. But title loans have significant drawbacks. Title loans are risky because they charge high fees and you risk losing your car if you are late paying.

Title lenders typically target borrowers with low credit scores or minimal credit histories who cannot qualify for lower-cost loans elsewhere.

“In an ideal world, no one would take out a title loan,” says Evan Gorenflo, senior financial advisor with the personal finance app Albert. “It’s not something you typically associate with progress or a financial goal. Rather, it’s designed to help you through a desperate time.”

What is the cost of a title loan?

Title loans generally have interest rates equivalent to 200% to 300% APR. A title loan generally has a better interest rate than a payday loan, which can carry an APR of 400% or more. However, its rate is significantly higher than personal loans or credit cards, which typically have maximum APRs around 36%.

“Home loans are tricky because a lot of people rely on their car to make money,” says Gorenflo. “In that situation, you’re giving up your title as collateral. Sometimes you give them a second set of keys to your car, they put the GPS in your car in some cases, so you’re really making it easier for them to confiscate your car if you are unable to repay this amount.”

How much can you borrow with a title loan?

The range you will be able to borrow depends on your personal circumstances, but generally lenders will allow you to borrow between $100 and $10,000. The usual loan term is two weeks to one month, similar to how a payday loan works.

“There’s a limit to how much you can borrow,” says Gorenflo. “If your car is worth $10,000, they won’t let you borrow the full amount. Sometimes it’s 25% of your capital limit. Some lenders will actually ask you to own your car before you giving a title loan Each lender will operate a little differently.

Advantages and disadvantages of title loans

What are the alternatives to title loans?

If you need money to pay for expenses like utility bills, credit card payments, or rent, try contacting your creditors to set up repayment plans that don’t require you to take out a loan. You never know what options might be available to you unless you reach out and ask.

Other alternatives to title lending include asking friends for money, joining side gigs from ridesharing apps, or contacting local charities or religious organizations. If you qualify, you may want to take out a credit card or personal loan with a lower APR than a title loan. You will still borrow money, but it will cost you less in terms of interest.

“If you need money fast, if you need to make $200, you can do it in a weekend with Uber,” says Gorenflo. “Even if it’s a little more wear and tear on your car, if it saves you from taking out a loan at 300% interest, it could definitely be worth it.”

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FinHealth 2022 Spending Report Marks First-Ever Drop in Ten-Year History of Tracking Fees and… | News https://computerchip7.com/finhealth-2022-spending-report-marks-first-ever-drop-in-ten-year-history-of-tracking-fees-and-news/ Thu, 28 Apr 2022 12:00:00 +0000 https://computerchip7.com/finhealth-2022-spending-report-marks-first-ever-drop-in-ten-year-history-of-tracking-fees-and-news/ Chicago, Illinois, April 28, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — The Financial Health Network, the national authority on financial health, in partnership with Prudential Financial, today released The 2022 FinHealth Spending Report, examining how U.S. households managed their finances and accessed credit in the second year of the pandemic. Analysis of year-over-year trends for more than two […]]]>

Chicago, Illinois, April 28, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — The Financial Health Network, the national authority on financial health, in partnership with Prudential Financial, today released The 2022 FinHealth Spending Report, examining how U.S. households managed their finances and accessed credit in the second year of the pandemic. Analysis of year-over-year trends for more than two dozen financial products and services revealed a rare drop in overall spending, though an outsized cost burden remains for underserved populations, prompting concerns with an increase planned for the coming year.

Key data shows total interest and fees fell to $305 billion for 2021 from a peak of $319 billion in 2020, a 4% drop largely due to shifts in spending on credit cards and student loans. However, access to financial services remains costly for traditionally underserved populations, with massive disparities in spending by race and ethnicity, income, and level of financial health. This year’s report found that households deemed to be in poor financial health accounted for 83% of all fees and interest paid.

As a percentage of their income, black households spent on average more than double what white households spent on interest and fees (7% vs. 3%), while Latinx households spent 40% more than households whites (5% versus 3%). . Additionally, low-to-moderate income households spent almost three times more of their income on interest and fees than higher income households (8% vs. 3%).

“The last two years of the pandemic have been a financial roller coaster for people, often forcing them to recalibrate their lives and finances with each new development of COVID,” said the Financial’s president and CEO. Health Network, Jennifer Tescher. “While we have seen a rare drop in overall spending on financial services in 2021, the confluence of rising consumer spending, the end of government handouts and rising inflation portend higher fees and costs. interest for 2022 that will likely fall disproportionately on households that are already struggling financially.

The 2022 FinHealth Spending Report tells the story of high-level economic trends while providing unique insights into the particular issues shaping individual product markets. A product data snapshot includes:

Discovered:

Overdraft and insufficient funds (NSF) fees appear to have plateaued, totaling around $11 billion in 2020 and 2021. Recent overdraft reform announcements by several major banks could create positive changes in this market in 2022. Black households with bank accounts were almost twice as numerous. as likely as white households to report having paid at least one overdraft, while Latinx households were almost one and a half times more likely. Financially vulnerable households with bank accounts were nearly ten times more likely to have an overdraft than financially sound households.

Student loans:

Interest and fees on total federal student loans fell precipitously from around $25 billion in 2019 to $6.3 billion in 2021 due to the moratorium, which took effect in March 2020 and, as of the publication date of this report in April 2022, is expected to expire in August. 31, 2022. For every month the moratorium is extended, this report estimates that federal student loan borrowers avoid $1.5 billion in interest payments. And, while federal student loans make up 92% of the $1.7 trillion loan portfolio, private student borrowers paid 30% more interest and fees in 2021 than federal student borrowers.

Credit card:

While interest and fees on revolving balances for general purpose and private label cards declined overall in 2021, balances saw a record jump in the last quarter of 2021 and are a wake-up call for financial health. approaching pre-pandemic levels. For the full year, interest and fees on revolving balances for general purpose credit cards fell about 10% to $95 billion, while corresponding totals for branded credit cards private fell about 13% to $11.4 billion.

Buy now, pay later (BNPL):

In March, a supplement

BNPL Brief

was published offering an in-depth look at these new technology-driven payment platforms showing that around one in four BNPL users are financially vulnerable, meaning they are struggling with most or all aspects of its financial life, and of those users near a quarterly report struggling to make payments.

Loans on pledge, payday and title:

Interest and fees for alternative financial services have dropped dramatically between 2019 and 2021, with pawnbroking income dropping 25%, payday loans 45% and title loans nearly 40% over the course of 2020. this period. Payday loans, in particular, have seen significant declines over the past year, with the percentage of households reporting use dropping from 5% in 2020 to 3% in 2021. Black households, low-income households in moderate and financially vulnerable households all reported significant declines in payday loan use.

“One of the reasons we are collaborating with the Financial Health Network is to further assess how households have managed their finances during the pandemic,” said Sarah Keh, vice president, Inclusive Solutions at Prudential. “Access to affordable, high-quality financial services—particularly in terms of race, ethnicity, and income—provides data for researchers, policymakers, and advocates to track trends and identify opportunities to support more equitable financial health policies and products.”

This report marks the 10th in the series overall and the second based on a new methodology, which combines extensive secondary research with a nationally representative survey of consumer spending. New to this year’s report is year-over-year trend data for consumer spending on a wide variety of common financial services, including bank account fees and most non-mortgage credit products. . This year’s report adds analysis on federal student loans, auto loans buy here, pay here (BHPH), services buy now, pay later (BNPL) and earned wage access products (EWA). In 2022, the Financial Health Network begins producing detailed briefs that take a closer look at products with particular implications for policymakers, financial service providers, and financial health in general.

For more information on the FinHealth Spend Report, please see the Report 2022.

About the Financial Health Network

The Financial Health Network is the leading authority on financial health. We are a trusted resource for business leaders, decision makers and innovators united in a mission to improve the financial health of their customers, employees and communities. Through research, advisory services, measurement tools, and cross-industry collaboration opportunities, we advance awareness, understanding, and proven best practices for better financial health for all. To learn more about the Financial Health Network, go to www.finhealthnetwork.org and follow us on Twitter at @FinHealthNet.

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Naomi Adams Bata Financial Health Network 312-881-5847 nadamsbata@finhealthnetwork.org Stephanie Hicks Cosmo PR for the Financial Health Network 805-295-9455 stephanie@cosmo-pr.com

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Child tax credit: is the expanded child tax credit dead? Did this help? https://computerchip7.com/child-tax-credit-is-the-expanded-child-tax-credit-dead-did-this-help/ Thu, 21 Apr 2022 00:00:00 +0000 https://computerchip7.com/child-tax-credit-is-the-expanded-child-tax-credit-dead-did-this-help/ Children ate better, families paid off debt, and parents could improve their job skills when the expanded child tax credit was sent directly to American families. That’s according to a Brookings Institution global working paper released this month that examines the now-defunct expansion, which was paid monthly for six months. The report, “The Impacts of […]]]>

Children ate better, families paid off debt, and parents could improve their job skills when the expanded child tax credit was sent directly to American families.

That’s according to a Brookings Institution global working paper released this month that examines the now-defunct expansion, which was paid monthly for six months. The report, “The Impacts of the 2021 Expanded Child Tax Credit on Family Employment, Nutrition and Financial Well-Being”, draws data from the Social Policy Institute’s Child Tax Credit Panel Survey.

The nationally representative panel included 1,782 credit-eligible US parents. The survey also had a comparison group of 2,015 ineligible households. The evaluation was based on a survey wave just after receipt of the final payment.

As part of the US bailout, Congress temporarily increased the child tax credit from $2,000 to $3,000 for income-qualifying families for children ages 6 to 17, or to $3,600 for younger children. For the second half of 2021, payments were sent monthly to most eligible families. And the credit was made refundable, so families with little or no earned income were eligible, which is normally not the case.

At the end of 2021, the expanded tax credit did the same, even though tax filing season has just ended and many are collecting the half that was to be paid as a lump sum.

The report found that families generally used the monthly payments “to cover living expenses without reducing their employment. Eligible families benefited from better nutrition, less reliance on credit cards and other high-risk financial services, and also made long-term educational investments for parents and children.

The changes were “particularly promising” for low- and middle-income families, as well as black, Hispanic and other minority families, according to the report, which was led by researchers from Appalachian State University, Washington University. in St. Louis, the University of North Carolina Greensboro and Urban Institute.

Some common uses of monthly installments include:

  • 70% paid for current household expenses like housing and utilities.
  • 58% bought clothes or other essentials for their children.
  • 56% bought more food for the family.
  • 49% have money set aside for emergencies.
  • 42% have repaid their debts.

The researchers did not find statistically significant job changes for those who were eligible for monthly payments and those who were not. But the authors noted that eligible households were 1.3 times more likely to start work on learning new job skills, compared to those not eligible for the tax credit.

“Low- and middle-income families eligible for the (tax credit) were also more likely to report having acquired work skills, more likely to report improvements in their ability to manage emergency expenses, and less likely to report using expensive financial services like payday. auto title loans and loans, compared to non-CTC eligible families,” the report said.

More than 6 in 10 people who received monthly payments said it was easier for them to budget, compared to receiving a tax credit in a lump sum after filing their taxes. And a report from Niskanen Center said the payments were particularly helpful to people in rural communities.

But according to Voice‘s Dylan Matthews, “There’s a simple answer to why the Child Credit didn’t continue: There weren’t 50 senators willing to support the extension. And most public reporting suggests that the main holdout was Senator Joe Manchin.

Manchin, a Democrat from West Virginia, rejected many social policy proposals under Biden’s Build Back Better framework. As for the child tax credit, he would like a household income cap of $60,000 and a firm work requirement, Axios reported.

“Some reports have also suggested that Manchin believed the the money would go for buy drugs — a lingering concern about cash programs for the poor (Manchin’s office declined to confirm or deny that he expressed this concern privately),” Matthews wrote. “This suspicion is ill-founded; the better review of the evidence on the issue I know there is little reason to believe that cash transfers increase drug or alcohol abuse. »

Others expressed concern that the child tax credit, without work incentives, would actually discourage work. Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Florida, for example, has pushed for more credit, but doesn’t think families should get the credit if they don’t earn enough income, as the Deseret News reported in january.

A work document by researchers at the University of Chicago’s Becker Friedman Institute for Economics in October predicted that having no work requirement “would drive 1.5 million workers (about 2.6% of all parents who work) to leave the labor market”. This, in turn, would reduce the gains made in reducing child poverty, they said.

Others, including Greg Nasif, spokesman for the bipartisan nonprofit advocacy organization Humanity Forward, believe the payments have been a big help in strengthening families and boosting jobs.

“We have never seen a government program that works so effectively,” Nasif told Deseret News. “He gives money directly to people who need it. It reaches well over 90% of the people it is supposed to support. Families use it to better feed their children. They use it to get back to work. By earmarking the money for child care costs, it frees them up to work more hours. There has been a marked growth in the number of low-income people who are self-employed, starting new businesses, developing non-profit organizations, etc.

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Types of bad credit loans and their uses https://computerchip7.com/types-of-bad-credit-loans-and-their-uses/ Thu, 14 Apr 2022 21:07:05 +0000 https://computerchip7.com/types-of-bad-credit-loans-and-their-uses/ If you have bad credit and need cash fast, you may not realize that you may still have loans you qualify for. A loan for bad credit could be an option if you have been refused by your bank or credit union and borrowing from relatives or friends is not an option. There are several […]]]>

If you have bad credit and need cash fast, you may not realize that you may still have loans you qualify for. A loan for bad credit could be an option if you have been refused by your bank or credit union and borrowing from relatives or friends is not an option.

There are several types of bad credit loans to choose from. They often come with high interest rates that could cost you several hundred or thousands of dollars more over the life of the loan. It is therefore worth exhausting all your options and exploring other alternatives before applying for a loan for bad credit. However, if you’re in trouble, a bad credit loan might be what you need.

What is a bad credit loan?

Bad credit loans are designed for consumers with low credit ratings who cannot be approved for financing elsewhere. You can expect higher interest rates and fees with these loans because the risk of default is higher.

The FICO scoring model, which 90% of lenders and creditors use to make a loan decision, ranges from 300 to 850. Lenders who offer bad credit loans typically target consumers in these FICO score ranges:

  • Bad credit: 300 to 579
  • Fair credit: 580 to 669

Although these loans are expensive for borrowers, the advantage is that you can get the money you need to meet an unexpected expense or financial emergency. Additionally, some lenders offer a simplified application process and same-day or next-day financing.

Secured loans

Secured loans are for consumers whose credit is not perfect, but require some form of collateral to be approved. Title loans and home equity loans are popular secured loan options, but you risk losing your car or home if you fail to repay the loan.

Still, they might work if you haven’t found better options elsewhere and don’t anticipate any problems repaying the loan on time.

Before applying for a secured loan, research several lenders that offer title and home equity loans to determine if you meet their eligibility criteria. You’ll probably have better luck with a title loan if your credit score is in the trenches, but you may qualify for a home equity loan from some lenders.

Loans without credit check

As the name suggests, these loan products do not require a credit check to be approved. They are attractive to borrowers with very low credit ratings who have been turned down for other loan products, but come with high interest rates to compensate for the risk they pose to the lender. As a result, you could get a monthly payment that doesn’t quite fit your budget and find yourself in even more financial trouble over time.

Some lenders will extend the loan term on these loan products to give you a lower, more attractive monthly payment. However, this simply means that you will pay more interest over the term of the loan, as the lender will have more time to collect the interest from you.

Common loans without a credit check include payday loans, installment loans, auto title loans, and cosigner loans.

Payday loans

Payday loans offer a short-term solution for borrowers in credit difficulty. These loans usually come with exorbitant interest rates, sometimes well into the triple digits, and capped at around $500.

Most payday lenders won’t check your credit to qualify for a loan, and you could get the loan proceeds within hours. Nevertheless, payday loans should only be used as a last resort, as the cost of borrowing is high. Plus, you’ll usually have to pay back what you borrow before the next payday or face high fees if you extend the term of the loan. This could lead to a vicious cycle that is difficult to escape.

Cash advances

A cash advance allows you to withdraw funds from your credit card‘s available balance up to the preset limit established by your credit card issuer. The amount you borrow is added to your outstanding credit card balance. You will likely pay a higher interest rate than on regular credit card purchases.

Cash advances are usually made by withdrawing cash from an ATM. You can also request a cash advance from a cashier at the physical branch of the credit card issuer (if applicable).

If possible, use cash advances only in times of financial emergency. Although they offer a quick fix if you’re in financial difficulty, they can be expensive and keep you in credit card debt for an extended period of time.

Banking agreements

Some banks offer short-term loans for smaller amounts to account holders with a positive banking history. However, the qualification criteria differ depending on the financial institution. You should therefore contact your bank or credit union to determine if this option is viable for you.

Alternatives to Bad Loans

Although bad credit loans are designed to help consumers who have difficulty accessing finance, they can be expensive and predatory in some cases. If you are facing a financial emergency or unexpected expenses, here are some viable alternatives:

  • Asking a relative or friend for money. Be sure to write out a repayment plan that works for both parties to avoid problems later.
  • Use a credit card. If you have available credit on a credit card, the cost of reading it is likely much less than what you’ll pay if you take out a bad credit loan. However, you want to pay back what you spend as soon as possible to avoid spending a fortune on interest.
  • Find local help. Some communities have religious and nonprofit organizations that offer financial assistance to those going through a financial crisis.

Most importantly, work on building your emergency fund and improving your credit. That way, you might not have to borrow money the next time life comes around. Plus, you’ll potentially qualify for loan options with better terms and more competitive interest rates if you don’t have enough savings to cover a financial emergency should it arise.

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Insider Selling: Elevate Credit, Inc. (NYSE: ELVT) Insider sells 6,000 shares https://computerchip7.com/insider-selling-elevate-credit-inc-nyse-elvt-insider-sells-6000-shares/ Wed, 13 Apr 2022 09:25:39 +0000 https://computerchip7.com/insider-selling-elevate-credit-inc-nyse-elvt-insider-sells-6000-shares/ Elevate Credit, Inc. (NYSE: ELVT – Get a rating) insider David Curry Peterson sold 6,000 shares of the company in a trade that took place on Thursday, April 7. The shares were sold at an average price of $3.04, for a total transaction of $18,240.00. Following the completion of the transaction, the insider now directly […]]]>

Elevate Credit, Inc. (NYSE: ELVTGet a rating) insider David Curry Peterson sold 6,000 shares of the company in a trade that took place on Thursday, April 7. The shares were sold at an average price of $3.04, for a total transaction of $18,240.00. Following the completion of the transaction, the insider now directly owns 94,973 shares of the company, valued at approximately $288,717.92. The transaction was disclosed in a legal filing with the Securities & Exchange Commission, which is available via this hyperlink.

David Curry Peterson also recently made the following trade(s):

  • On Monday, February 7, David Curry Peterson sold 2,000 shares of Elevate Credit. The stock was sold at an average price of $3.32, for a total transaction of $6,640.00.

Shares of Stock ELVT opened at $2.99 ​​on Wednesday. Elevate Credit, Inc. has a 1-year low of $2.54 and a 1-year high of $4.26. The stock’s 50-day moving average is $3.21. The company has a market capitalization of $93.39 million, a price-earnings ratio of -2.79 and a beta of 2.16.

Increase credit (NYSE: ELVTGet a rating) last released its quarterly earnings data on Tuesday, February 15. The company reported ($0.42) earnings per share (EPS) for the quarter. Elevate Credit had a negative return on equity of 9.44% and a negative net margin of 8.06%. The company had revenue of $129.53 million for the quarter. During the same period a year earlier, the company posted EPS of $0.23.

Separately, Zacks Investment Research moved shares of Elevate Credit from a “sell” rating to a “hold” rating in a Wednesday, Jan. 5 research report.

A number of institutional investors and hedge funds have recently increased or reduced their stake in ELVT. Walleye Capital LLC bought a new position in shares of Elevate Credit in the fourth quarter worth $39,000. Stokes Family Office LLC bought a new position in shares of Elevate Credit in the third quarter worth $48,000. Royal Bank of Canada bought a new position in shares of Elevate Credit in the third quarter worth $48,000. Two Sigma Securities LLC bought a new position in Elevate Credit during Q3 for $49,000. Finally, Northern Trust Corp increased its stake in Elevate Credit by 20.5% during the fourth quarter. Northern Trust Corp now owns 39,330 shares of the company valued at $117,000 after acquiring an additional 6,702 shares in the last quarter. Institutional investors hold 47.22% of the company’s shares.

About Elevate Credit (Get a rating)

Elevate Credit, Inc. engages in the provision of online financial services for consumers of subprime credit. It provides online credit solutions to consumers in the United States and United Kingdom who are not well served by traditional banking products and who are looking for options other than payday loans, title loans, pledge and installment loans on display.

See also

Insider buying and selling by quarter for Elevate Credit (NYSE:ELVT)



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